Popondetta Recollections


AtoZ2019PThis series of blog posts is part of the A to Z 2019 Blogging Challenge in which I will write snapshot memories of my early married life in the then Territory of Papua New Guinea.

However, today’s post comes from my husband’s recollections of his first home in the Territory of Papua New Guinea when he was just a small boy. His father was in charge of the high school and technical school, his mother a teacher in the Australian-curriculum school.

A small boy stands with his sister

Family747Beside his dad in colonial whites

Framed by their bush material home.

Less than a decade since war ended here

An old Army Jeep under the house

The wartime road made of

Coconut trunks lying in mud

Be careful or a Land Rover

Will bog up to the wheel-well in mud.

Tropical nightfall brings flying foxes in many thousands

Heading for the food gardens

Taking an hour to pass overhead.

37 Lee and Peter 3rd house Popodetta 1955

The gecko watches the evening nibbles

Then sneaks down

Licking sugar off the jelly beans.

Under the house a cane bar

“Cass Bar” illuminated on a glass louvre

A kasbah, ha ha, where friends visited.

PNG938

Patrol into Mt Lamington c1954. The two men would be police. © Les Cass

His dad ventures to explore Mt Lamington

Erodes the soles from his Dunlop Volleys.

PNG935

A labour line takes a break or sets up camp. © Les Cass (The tropical mould has had its way with this image).

Bringing education to the people

His father walks into the site of a new school

The labour line carries the component parts

To be a government school after all.

His first school, his mother his first teacher

An A-school infiltrated by white ants

Their feelers holding up the structure.

Mt Lamington as a backdrop

Two years past its eruption

If it smokes all is okay, If not – beware.

28 Cass backyard Popondetta bet 1952 and 1956

Popondetta backyard but not the garden “boi”.

Garden bois swing their sarifs to clear the bush

Both wife murderers – a traditional act

White man’s justice means

They wear red laplaps marked with arrows.

On the coast outrigger canoes

Surf into the black sand beach.

Orokaiva ceremonial dress

Orokaiva people. Photo taken c1954 © Les Cass

Thank you Mr Cassmob for sharing these memories.

You can read an earlier post about Popondetta here.

Tok Pisin:

Boi – the Pidgin term at the time for local staff.

Pikinini – child

Painim – look for

Payback – compensation for an injury or death eg killing a person, or a pig.

pik – pig

pukpuk – crocodile

pekpek – faeces (don’t confuse these last three)

 

 

2 thoughts on “Popondetta Recollections

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.