All App’d up for Congress in five more days

Congress 2015My email this morning included one from Congress 2015 convenor, Kerrie Gray…the new Congress app (on Android and Apple) is now available. Over my morning coffee I downloaded the app to my iPad, and added the sessions, and keynotes, that I was attending.

Kerrie offered these useful guidelines for adding presentations to the “My Program” section of the app so you can have all your planned sessions in one place (don’t forget to add the keynotes and any lunches you’ve signed up for):

You can personalise the App by adding your Program.  When viewing any presentation from the program there is a button to add (or remove) that presentation to “My Program” and, when you have done that and select then My Program from the menu,  you will get a list of all the presentations you have chosen in chronological order.

I had no problems adding all my selected sessions to the My Program app and now I’m all set for when the Congress speaking program kicks off on Friday 27th.

I was also pleased to see my revised Sunday session title is on the App (Harness the Power of Blogging for your One Place Study…and other research). This is not a session about how to blog, rather the benefits you can gain when you put your family stories and research online with a blog. My focus is on how you can use this for your research into a particular place, irrespective of whether you have a formal One Place Study.

There are other tabs on the app:

  • The wonderful sponsors who help to make Congress possible without costing each of us an arm and a leg. We also get to learn more about these genealogy programs, books, cruises, and companies who can help us add value to our research.
  • Exhibitors and supporters who will have stands in the Exhibition Hall
  • A list of the speakers with their presentations and hot links to the abstracts for each presentation…lots of fantastic talks on offer.
  • Congress Functions: I’m looking forward to meeting people at the Welcome and also the Congress dinner.
  • Facilities: you can see the layout of the rooms we’ll be using in the Convention Centre.
  • A push facility to tell us when the next bus will be leaving etc.

I used my RootsTech app constantly while in Salt Lake City so I’m very excited to have this Congress 2015 app available (go to Google Play or the App option on iPad). I can see it being my “go to” place to keep on top of where I need to be and what I’m listening to. I type my notes into Evernote (most of the time) so it’s handy to have everything on the iPad. I may also load it on my Android smart phone.

And a reminder: don’t forget to add your Research Interests to the main Congress website by logging in with your registration password and spend some time seeing who else may be interested in your families/place. We’ve all received a list of those delegates who agreed to have their names published so you can keep an eye out for them.

DSC_3196And if you are from Queensland, or research Queensland families, try to find me around the traps as I have a ribbon you can add to your Congress name badge.

I also have a ribbon for members of the Kiva Genealogists for Families group – so once again see me or or GFF founder and team leader, Judy Webster.

And if you need to know more about what’s where in Canberra, buy your shuttle bus tickets, or just ask a general Congress question – visit the Purple Patch stand in the Exhibition Hall or keep an eye out for the Purple Patch people roaming the area…what a great idea.

thanksAt this stage I’m pretty sure Kerrie and all the Congress volunteers will be running on adrenaline to get across the line…I’d like to offer them a huge THANK YOU for all they’ve done to bring Congress 2015 to fruition.

Don’t forget that if you use social media you can follow what’s happening by looking at the Twitter tag #AFFHO.

Are you excited? I know I am! Look forward to seeing you there.

 

Meet Congress 2015 Speaker: Grace Karskens

KarskensToday’s Congress 2015 speaker interview is with Grace Karskens from the University of New South Wales, one of the keynote presenters. I’m excited about her presentation and think it will offer much food for thought for all of us.

I wonder if you could tell us a little about your background?  Are you a genealogist, researcher, historian or representing your organisation?  

I am a historian. I teach Australian history at the University of New South Wales. I also have a degree in historical archaeology, so I always try to read the material record of the past as well as the documentary one.

How has genealogy/family history/history/heraldry improved or changed your life? What do you love most about genealogy/family history/history/heraldry? 

Family history is so important in my work. Many of my books and articles take a close look at societies and people who have vanished forever. Family history offers a rich source for understanding those societies and people, for example, for looking at family formation, who married whom, where people moved to, and so on. I’m always looking for patterns, and how these patterns fit into the bigger picture – the economy, society, culture and environment. Like most family historians, I am so often amazed at the great human stories even just the lists of births, marriages and deaths open up or suggest. I am also very grateful for the generosity and skills of so many family historians who are happy to share their work.

One day I would love to explore my own family history – my parents were both post war migrants, they met in Sydney in the 1950s. Dad was from Zaandam and Harlem in the Netherlands. Mum grew up in a Dutch-Indonesian family in Indonesia. But I’m too busy with other people’s stories at the moment! Maybe a retirement project?

Have you attended Congress in previous years?

No, looking forward to my first.

 What are your key topics for Congress?

My keynote is called ‘Men, women, sex and desire: family history on Australia’s first frontier’. I’m getting down to the nitty gritty of what family history – making families – is all about! I’ll present some of the findings from the book I am working on at the moment – The Lost World of Castlereagh – exploring male-female relationships and what sort of community settlers made on the Nepean River, why finding a partner and having children was so important to these people, the impact of the uneven gender ratio, and the fact that there were so many young convict men around, and so few women.

How do you think your topic/s will help the family historians at Congress 2015?

I’m hoping I can bring the lost world and people of Castlereagh to life: recreate the landscape of relationships between men and women, and also parents and children; look at what mattered to people, and what choices they had. In short, see them as human beings in complex situations.

What do you think are the benefits of attending a large conference like this, for you personally and for others attending?

Reaching so many people will be great, and I always learn a lot from questions and chatting during the breaks.

Do you have a favourite piece of advice or a tip or trick you can share with conference attendees?

One of my favourite inspirational quotes is from the great historian Greg Dening. He wrote that we have re-imagine ‘the past’s own present’. That is, we have to try to enter the worlds of past people from their own point of view, their own situations, their own moral and cultural ideals, rather than our own.

In the ‘past’s own present’ we have to imagine what it is like not knowing what happens next, because they didn’t.

 Is there somewhere we can connect with you online?

People can email me at my university email address.

Thanks Grace for sharing your “take” on family history in its broader context. With such an interesting title I’m sure you’ll get lots of interest. 

 

Let’s get Congress ‘Appy

Congress 2015Exciting news to hand from the Congress 2015 organisers…we are to have a Congress app which will contain all sorts of handy info making it easy to carry Congress content (and current) on your smart phone or tablet.

I used the RootsTech app when I was at Salt Lake and found it super-helpful so expect the Congress App is bound to keep me similarly ‘appy.

What content is expected to be included in the App? Here’s the interim list:

  • Able to be navigated by day/session/room/speaker – with details and abstracts for each presentation.
  •  Your own list of selected sessions under a function called “My Program” which can be added to/amended throughout to enable you to keep on top of what you have planned to attend.
  •  A list of Sponsors, Supporters & Exhibitors (with links to their websites),
  •  Speakers (with links back to their presentations),
  •  Facilities (with information about transport, the exhibition hall and catering),
  •  Functions and  About Congress 2015 (with an interactive Google map of the area & a downloadable floor map of the venue etc) be-happy-use-the-congress-2015-app (1)
  •  Push functionality so any Congress messages can be sent out at short notice.  eg next bus for the Dinner leaving at …

Delegate information will not be included so don’t forget you need to add your research interests on the website by using your Congress log-in. Have a scroll through the interests already added and see if anyone else is researching the same names or places.

 Let’s get Appy for Congress 2015.

Black Cats and Bingo Callers: Congress 2015 Final Registration

As the bingo callers say “13, lucky for some” as it is for genealogists who’ve been procrastinating about Congress 2Friday 13015 in Canberra. The big day is now only 13 days away and today is the last day to submit your late registration, sign up for the social functions, and generally start thinking about your session attendance and research plans. There’s going to be a whole array of great speakers, not to mention a mob of great genies, so do you really want to miss out?

Congress is a triennial event and Canberra is really not that far from any of the capitals except Darwin and Perth, but then we’re used to that. It also has wonderful research repositories: The Australia War Memorial (venue for the welcome function), the National Library of Australia, the National Archives of Australia, the National Sound and Film Archive, Australian National University Library etc.

Congress 2015With more and more genealogists researching solo online and not members of societies, the Congress has the added benefit of meeting fellow enthusiasts, sharing knowledge and picking people’s experience to help with your own research even beyond the scheduled speakers.

I’d like to suggest that we all make a point of being open to meeting new people and welcoming them into the genea-fold. Sure we are all a little shy with people we don’t know, but we do have something in common with which to kick off our introductions – so let’s get our brief genie snapshot ready to tell others where we’re researching and the names.

Last night’s Hangout on Air from GeniAus has lots of tips on Congress and what to expect. Similarly the TravelGenee, Fran, also posted a good intro to Congress on her blog yesterday.

My checklist:

Image from shutterstock.com

Image from shutterstock.com

 

Why not join us all at Congress 2015 and take your genie learning to new heights?

Hurry, there’s only hours until registration closes.

Dare I do it?

Tonight I had a glitch with GeniAus’s Hangout on Air for which the topic was an enquiry from Sharon from Gathering Dust blog re how we each handle our filing/”piling” system.

Perhaps the gods were laughing,as after the first minutes I was inaudible to anyone and my screen dump didn’t work. In the end I left to hangout with living family members who dropped by unexpectedly.

family-history-back-to-basicsHowever I think Sharon’s enquiry has a lot of merit and fits with my aspirations to get back to basics. I am much more confident of my old-style filing system which lets me readily (mostly!) find documents, whereas my digital filing is more like Topsy – it just grewed. At this point it’s worth reiterating that I have been researching for nearly 30 years, long before the digital era hence a partial-explanation of the Topsy system.

Hard copy system

I have long had multiple A4 arch-lever folders categorised by family name, and sometimes by generation. Within each folder I have the documents sourced by topic eg church, land, civic, certificates, military. This means that I have only one “cluster” of information to peruse if I want to locate a document. Generally this involves minimal disruption and has worked well over many years.

It also allows me to have folders for what have become my one place studies on Dorfprozelten and Clare. Dorfprozelten info is mostly filed by family as there is a limited number of them, while Clare is by topic. General research has its own tab/folder.

The only problem with this system is the increasing number of bookcases, and filing, required.

Digital filing system

This is where I start to come to grief more often than with hard copies. Once again I have all my families in one folder “111 Family History” which places it at the top of my file directories. Within that folder I have sub-folders by surname and in particular cases, by place or research topic. If the information regarding place is specific to one family I file under that name.

With women I file under married name, post-marriage, and by family of origin/maiden name prior to marriage.

Screen dump filing system

I haven’t been in the practice of naming the files consistently and this is one thing I want to remedy. I do use the surname, first name and content/source concept (again, generally rather than consistently).

In the past I was in the habit of filing photographs, including those of documents in archives/libraries, under my Photographs folder by name/place etc. I don’t believe this is working any more and that I need to move research photos to the family history folder which relates. In this way I have them all “together”. Nor have I been good about adding metadata but have been slowly adding this over time and with more knowledge under my belt thanks to a RootsTech lab class, hopefully I’ll get better. I need to remember that slow and steady wins the race rather than hustle, bustle.

Cluster Research (FANs) and One Place Studies (OPS)

This is where I can really get in a tangle. Even before I signed up to a One Place Study, I had been collecting all relevant names from whichever parish register/document I’d been looking at for my family. I’ve found it all too easy for this to get messy. It’s also why I find genealogy programs restrictive but perhaps I need to have another go with an open mind. I’m presently exploring Family Historian, RootsMagic and Heredis as my long-time Aussie program, Relatively Yours, seems to be on the way out which is a great shame as it has always offered an innovative idea of family.

In the past I’ve entered the OPS data into an Excel workbook which is saved under the family name, or the place, depending on which is relevant. This lets me sort the data into family clusters in a separate spreadsheet while maintaining the original in time sequence. I make a practice of entering surnames/family names in a separate column from first names which makes sorting more reliable and effective.

Brickbats

DunceI’ve been slack about consistent naming of files and I haven’t had an overall plan before launching into naming files.

I’ve separated photos I’ve taken of documents from my other research documents on that family (in some/many cases). Quite honestly I have way too many photos of all types!

My Downloads folder has become a default documents folder and needs a major spring clean and the relocation of sub-folders to their correct place.

The filing keeps on piling up until it annoys the hell out of me and I have to clear the decks – often before I travel!

bouquetBouquets

I’ve kept my hard copy files according to a pretty coherent system. This applies in particular to my Kunkel family files because this is how I ordered them when writing my book. Within the Kunkel Book folder I have the family documents subdivided by the first generation. I have the photo folder following the same system. However, as you can see, I still have some wayward files.Family History Book screen dump

With my East Clare discoveries on Trove I’ve been more consistent with my file naming conventions, using SURNAME, First Name, article reference. This may be because I’ve been doing these more recently. If I source photos elsewhere I add a code which indicates the repository eg QSA, JOL, SLQ.

I did manage to keep my Kunkel research documents in a coherent fashion which made it possible to publish the family history and organise two reunions, for which I set up my own database. (some positivity is needed here!) However, even here you can see that some wayward files have escaped from their proper place.

 WHERE TO?

Slow downGeniAus has given us hope and affirmation that there’s no one right way to process our family history (though she was a bit harsh on the cat!). However with the deluge of digital information I can’t avoid the conclusion that the data is now the master and I’m the slave….I need to reverse that process if it’s not to drown me out. What is quite illogical is that I’ve actually got worse since I’ve retired and had more time available…go figure!

I think Jill is absolutely spot-on when she says we have to choose a system which suits us – without that we will constantly self-sabotage.

Without a doubt I need to SLOW DOWN, take time, and be consistent.

 MIND MAPPING

mind-maps-for-genealogy-cover-smallThanks to a tip in the Hangout from Alex of Family Tree Frog blog, I’ve been playing with a new program called Coggle which I find quite intuitive to use. Her mention of this is timely as it fits with my long-term interest (but inaction), and the book I bought at RootsTech on Mindmapping for Genealogists. I’m playing with Coggle to mindmap how I’ve set out my Congress presentation on the marriage of family and local history.

 C’mon I’ve hung myself out to dry here….Do be brave and tell me: Am I alone in the schmozzle of filing/piling that I have? Are you totally organised and neatly systematic?

 

 

 

 

Only 28 more sleeps to Congress 2015

Congress 2015It’s just a month today until we’ll be enjoying the excitement of the Welcome Reception for Congress 2015. Isn’t it funny how we wait and wait for something special to come along then all of a sudden it’s upon us?

The Welcome Reception is being held at the Australian War Memorial so it will be very special to meet up with our genimates, and make new friends in the impressive and sobering shadow of the huge Lancaster bomber, G for George. Many of us will try to visit the War Memorial during our stay in Canberra and they have lots on offer for us this year, with the centenary of Gallipoli and the opening of the new World War I gallery.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAs we emerge from the welcome reception we’ll be able to look up and see the Roll of Honour names illuminated against the entrance to the memorial. I wonder if any of us will have a family name projected during Congress? You can search the roll of honour by name and see when that person’s name will be illuminated. Did you know you can sign up to receive the Coo-ee newsletter to learn more about what’s happening during the Centenary?

Then bright and early on the morning of Friday 27th March we will launch into the excitement of learning even more about this passion of ours, family history. There’s so much available for researchers with all levels of experience that I’m sure we’ll all learn so much, and be able to share our experiences with our family research during the breaks.

In recent months, the three official bloggers, Jill Ball, Shauna Hicks and myself, have been posting interviews with the various speakers at Congress. You can read more about each of them here by clicking the links: GeniAus, Shauna Hicks History Enterprises, Family History Across the Seas. I really think we’re in for a treat! You can also see the official Congress list of speakers here.

So here’s my checklist for your research preparation:

ChecklistHave you completed your Research Interest list? I wrote about this a little while ago.

Have you got your tentative schedule planned for the sessions?

Have you worked out what research you want to tackle while visiting the National Library of Australia, the National Archives of Australia and the Australian War Memorial?

Perhaps you want to visit the National Film and Sound Archive which holds a range of audio-visual recordings?

Are you going to visit the family history society or other archives?

Have you printed off the opening hours for each of the repositories you hope to visit, so you can maximise your efforts?

Have you got your local family history membership card? And your National Library card?

Are you a geneablogger? If so please get in touch with GeniAus as she’s preparing a list for blogger beads…you don’t want to miss out on the bling which gives easy recognition of fellow bloggers.

Are you a member of Kiva Genealogists for Families and coming to Congress? If so perhaps you could leave a message on my blog and I’ll pass it on to Judy Webster.

I think I’d best get my skates on and sort out some of these myself. Meanwhile it’s back to finalising my speaker presentations.

What other preparations have you made for your attendance at Congress 2015? Why not share them with us as a useful reminder to us all.

Exploring the Expo Hall at RootsTech/FGS

A quiet Expo Hall...for now.

A quiet Expo Hall…for now.

I’ve done the serious and the sightseeing… now it’s time for a quick synopsis of my explorations of the Expo Hall.

Last week I mentioned how the bloggers had a privileged tour of the Hall before Thursday’s Keynote Speeches. From then on it was busy, busy. I had looked at many of the companies’ websites, prepared a checklist, and highlighted a map of booths I didn’t want to miss and that worked well.

Find My Past and the Irish

I confess I didn’t spend time listening to the mini-presentations in the Expo Hall as there never seemed to be enough time. I do have membership with most of the big geneaproviders so have a good idea of where they’re at. However I did come along to hear the Find My Past speaker telling us what they were planning for Irish records, and let me tell you, they will have us dancing jigs when they arrive. I’ve been with FMP since way back, and totally enamoured of their recent Friday releases. It’s plain they don’t intend letting their game down.

DSC_3031

Here is a copy of the slide which they showed listing upcoming Irish resources in coming months (and yes, I did ask permission to use it). Just imagine what might be in there for the Irish diaspora.

Loved their badges with Kiss me, my ancestors were Irish/English/Scottish/Immigrants etc.

Quirky but enlightening

DSC_2927 crop

Nancy Douglas from WriteMeaning.

Nancy Douglas from WriteMeaning.

I had Write Meaning on my checklist and was lucky enough to find Nancy Douglas free, thanks to a mistake I made with scheduling. Nancy gave me a specific piece of text to handwrite in cursive, plus a couple of images to draw (I am so not an artist). She then analysed my writing and drawings using her experience as a certified handwriting analyst. Initially I was a bit nervous but the experience was very positive, though with a couple of family surprises. It was well worth my $US20 investment. The business also offers the opportunity to have your ancestor’s writing analysed which I think would be both fun and helpful – just need to find something I am certain they personally wrote…for those who could write.

Thanks Nancy for a fascinating interview.

Education

DSC_2949

Tahitia McCabe who was representing the Uni of Strathclyde.

I wanted to look at three stands: Board for Certification of Genealogists, the University of Strathclyde, and the National Institute for Genealogical Studies. I know friends who are doing NIGS units but no one so far who’s doing Strathclyde’s program. At present I’m not in a position to commit to any of these – family obligations – but I will be giving them some serious thought.

I was also interested in the Association of Personal Historians – another to consider.

DNA

I decided to purchase an Ancestry DNA kit while I was in the Expo Hall and have returned it, as I believe we can’t yet get them opin Oz. Apparently the results will be ready in 6-8 weeks. It will be interesting to see how it compares with my Family Tree DNA tests. I hope it was worth the sacrifice of not buying that nice coat from Macy’s <smile>.

You can read what I wrote about my RootsTech/FGS genetic genealogy learning here on the Worldwide Genealogy blog.

StoryWorth

Hope and team from Story Worth.

Hope and team from StoryWorth.

Of course I’ve already mentioned StoryWorth and what a pleasure it was to meet the team, especially Hope with whom I’d been in email contact. I’ve got my other half signed up with their program. I think it’s an easy way to get answers to questions in bite-sized chunks.

Books and resources

Foolishly I didn't write down this young lady's name, though I did ask if I could publish her photo.

We had a good chat with Laura and I got her permission to use this photo. Thanks Laura!

I promised myself “no books”, after all I’m trying to declutter, but there were a few I couldn’t resist. I bought Zapping the Grandma Gap (Janet Hovorka), Mind Maps for Genealogy (Ron Arons), and Maureen Taylor’s Family Photo Detective. I could have bought the latter as an e-book but my photo books are among my most-used resources so I went for a hard copy.

I just had to check out Eneclann which publishes great Irish books and CDs, more and more of which are available as downloadable e-books once purchased.

Genimates

Lisa Louisa Cooke from Genealogy Gems was on my visiting list and she kindly agreed to be photographed with me. I had already been to a couple of sessions she presented.

Of course I had to visit with Alan and Alona at Unlock the Past Cruises.

Flying the flag at Unlock the Past Cruises.

Flying the flag at Unlock the Past Cruises.

The Media Hub was in the midst of the Expo activity and there always seemed to be a genimate to wave to. Thanks Thomas MacEntee for my fab ribbons!

And the (free) Soda Fountain had great lemonade to wet one’s whistle, and was always popular.

Fun

DSC_3128 editOne of the American traditions, which doesn’t happen in Australia, is the supply of ribbons and buttons to add to one’s bling. It might look a bit silly from the outside but is good fun.

The Geneabloggers’ beads, provided in 2015 by Dear MYRTLE and Cousin Russ, got comments from lots of people and made it easy to identify fellow bloggers. I was surprised how small a drop we were in the ocean of attendees. I was tickled to bits when a coincidental conversation revealed the lady had read my Worldwide Genealogy post thanks to Randy Seaver’s Best of the Geneablogs 18-24 January 2015.

The Aussies contributed their own bling to the event with people taking Aussie stickers, koalas, tourist pins, and pens/keyrings with Aboriginal patterns. The recipients were really surprised and enjoyed sharing a bit of Down Under.

All over, red rover

That’s a wrap from me for Roots Tech. There’s so much more I could share but other commitments are calling. Don’t forget to check out the RootsTech Video Archive and consider purchasing a couple of FGS audio recordings (click through the 51 options). I’m sure you won’t be disappointed.

Randy Seaver, blogger extraordinaire at Genea-Musings, is keeping, and updating, a consolidated list of all blog posts relating to this record-breaking event. Thanks Randy for making it so much easier for us all to check our people’s experiences and learn from them.

It was such a lot of fun, especially catching up with my genimates, and meeting new ones.

Incidental Sightseeing Part 2: Salt Lake City

After my intense post this morning on ethics, genealogists and conferences, I hope you enjoy the light relief from my about-town photos of Salt Lake City.

The Zions First National Bank is such a pretty building. I'd have liked a better shot, but time was short and traffic was tricky.

The Zions First National Bank is such a pretty building. I’d have liked a better shot, but time was short and traffic was tricky.

This awning on a semi-derelict building near the Hilton Hotel kept catching my eye.

Check out the faces framing the awning.

Check out the faces framing the awning.

They make 'em big in the USA.

They make ’em big in the USA. My friend Sharn is dwarfed by this Ford 150.

We had a lovely meal at PF Chang's and met up with Linda Robbins and hubby.

We had a lovely meal at PF Chang’s and met up with Linda Robbins and hubby. Linda writes at http://hollingsworthrobbinsfamilytree.blogspot.com.au/

Salt Lake Temple in Temple Square.

Salt Lake Temple in Temple Square.

Collage of mountain scenery.

Collage of mountain scenery.

I made these two collages with Pic Collage, having been shown it by my new friend Laurie from Confuse the Dead (and also an FGS Ambassador). Thanks Laurie, it was as easy as you said, and good fun as well. I now have it on the iPad and the smart phone.

Socialising in Salt Lake.

Socialising in Salt Lake was interspersed with serious research and learning.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this little detour from serious genealogy.

 

Ethics, Genealogists and Conferences

Ethics and equity and the principles of justice do not change with the calendar.
(DH Lawrence) from http://www.brainyquote.com/

family-history-back-to-basicsSometimes we need to be reminded that this genealogical passion of ours isn’t just about vacuuming up as many names, dates and data as we can track down, wherever we find them. We are also obligated to act responsibly, with respect for family (especially living family), ownership of information, and with accountability to those who share their expertise with us.

With the upcoming AFFHO Congress in Canberra, all attendees need to become mindful and informed of ethical standards which should guide our family history research and how we disseminate it. Let’s get back to basics with these issues.

One of the earliest sessions I attended at FGS/RootsTech was one entitled The Ethical Genealogist, by highly regarded speaker Judy Russell – click to see an interview with her by James Tanner of Genealogy’s Star blog. (Although her session wasn’t video-taped, you can purchase the audio-recording here for $US10).

I’d never heard Judy speak before, though I follow the wisdom she shares on her blog, The Legal Genealogist. Only minutes into the presentation it was obvious that her excellent reputation was entirely deserved…she’s an engaging and informative speaker. Aussie genealogists who are planning on taking the 11th Unlock the Past Cruise from New Zealand to Australia will have the joy of hearing her present.

Anyway, back to my theme. Straight up Judy mentioned that it was okay to take photos for social media (at least that’s what I wrote down). Blind Freddy could work out that she didn’t mean take snaps of every single one of her slides and share the whole content. What’s happened subsequently, for her and other speakers, has caused something of firestorm which is pertinent to any conference we attend, whether wearing our genealogy hats or others.

Image purchased from Shutterstock.com

Image purchased from Shutterstock.com

Judy captured the essence of ethics in the playground rules we learnt in kindergarten:

  • tell the truth
  • play nice
  • don’t tell tales.

I’m not going to elaborate on these here – I think they’re pretty self- evident though Judy’s nuanced discussion of them certainly wasn’t elementary. However, when in the 21st century, with the avalanche of interest in genealogy some of these golden rules seem to have been lost.

I’ve mentioned before in my blog posts, that we should always, always ASK for permission to use someone else’s content, research or images. We should always, always ACKNOWLEDGE the other person’s research (whatever form it takes). I’ve certainly had photos from my website siphoned off and attached to family trees, without either of these happening, despite the copyright notice across the photo.

Image created in Microsoft Office Word.

Image created by Pauleen Cass in Microsoft Office Word.

Just recently, I also found a blog post I’d written (of which I was rather proud) for World Wide Genealogy, “happily” conjoined with a genea-product promotion on LinkedIn. I was NOT a happy camper because in my opinion it inferred that the post belonged to the product-owner. Carelessness or contrivance? Only weeks later the same thing happened with other genimates’ posts. Needless to say this was not a booth I visited in the Expo Hall at RootsTech – the product may be useful but I voted with my feet, and my wallet! Mind you, if the same person had been working I’d have been tempted to shame-job them by visiting.

stop-is-it-yours-ask-acknowledge

Image created with keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

It seems to me that too many of us are getting so absorbed with a belief in entitlement, with the justification that “I’m just sharing”, that we happily forget it’s not actually ours to share, and furthermore when we’ve signed up for programs we’ve specifically stated we will not abuse our membership in this way. These presentations, papers, slides, photos do NOT belong to us. After all if a person works making a chair, for example, we don’t think it’s okay to simply walk off with it and share it with our mates. Why? Because it’s the person’s income stream and also it’s THEFT. Ignorance may be bliss, but it’s no defence.

391 ethical dilemmasBack in February 2015 on the 4th Unlock the Past cruise, Jill Ball aka GeniAus hosted an Ethics Panel which was very interesting. One of the questions was around photographing every slide in a presenter’s talk. The panel was universal in believing this was a breach of their copyright. We have regularly bemoaned that we didn’t tape this session.

There have been some excellent posts written post-RootsTech, which ought to be high on our compulsory reading list.

Credit and Copyright by Judy Russell

Copyright and the Genealogy Lecture by Judy Russell

More Genealogy Copyright Issues by Michael Leclerc on the Mocavo blog.

Genealogy’s Star: James Tanner regularly posts on similar issues, based on his legal experience.

You can read the AFFHO Ethics standards here.

For further reading you might want to look at the following sites referenced by Judy Russell as providing standards for genealogists:

Board for Certification of Genealogists– Standards

Association of Professional Genealogists – Ethics

Thanks Judy Russell for your knowledge, commitment and discernment in raising our performance standards as genealogists and family historians.

Incidental Sightseeing Part 1: Salt Lake City

When you have less than a week to fit in four conference days, three visits to the Family History Library, and lots of socialising, there’s not much time left for actual sightseeing. I notched up some distance to-ing and fro-ing and along the way took shots that caught my eye. Here are some of them. My SLR is playing up at present so I took these with my phone camera.

View from my hotel room - isn't it pretty?

View from my hotel room – isn’t it pretty?

One of the entrances to the City Creek shopping mall...just up the road.

One of the entrances to the City Creek shopping mall…just up the road.

The creek which runs through the shopping complex.

The creek which runs through the shopping complex.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I just love fairy lights when it's wintertime overseas. These were a mix of white and yellow.

I just love fairy lights when it’s wintertime overseas. These were a mix of white and yellow.

Looks like it belongs in France to me.

Looks like it belongs in France to me.

Now THAT's an Apple shop!

Now THAT’s an Apple shop!

Abravnel Hall, Centre for the Arts. I liked the sun on the red art work and the rather Expo-ish street art.

Abravnel Hall, Centre for the Arts. I liked the sun on the red art work and the rather Expo-ish street art.

The impressive entry to the Salt Palace Convention Centre - site of RootsTech and FGS.

The impressive entry to the Salt Palace Convention Centre – site of RootsTech and FGS.

Liked this quirky construction.

Liked this quirky construction framed by the mountains.

I was surprised how quiet the streets were in SLC. You can see the Trax arriving in the centre of the road.

I was surprised how quiet the streets were in SLC. You can see the Trax arriving in the centre of the road.

Do join me for Part 2 of my Incidental Sightseeing tomorrow.