Finding the Fass in Bavarian papers

I have been spending happy hours chasing down stories about ancestors and other emigrants from the village of Dorfprozelten in this site for Bavarian newspapers: digiPress – Das Zeitungsportal der Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek

At least some of my discoveries are ones I’ve previously found by searching Google Books (yes, not newspapers) where you’ll find digital versions of some Bavarian newspapers. I wrote about this some years ago, here, here, here, and here

Aschaffenburger Zeitung, 22.12.1846 p4

Aschaffenburger Zeitung, 22.12.1846, p4

However, I’ve also found some new articles including the liquidation of my ancestor’s inn in Dorfprozelten, which seemed to teeter on, into the future for a while. Then last night I made a discovery of the sale of the inn in 1868. This occurred because key members of the family had died of Lungensucht which I understand to be tuberculosis or similar. The inn had been in the hands of my 2xgreat grandfather’s step-brother, Jakob August Ulrich who died on 19 June 1868, followed by his wife Elisabeth Firmbach on 20 August 1868. Shortly afterwards, on 15 October 1868, Eva Catharina Kunkel, born Happ, also died. Catharine Happ later Ulrich then Kunkel was the mother of both Jakob Ulrich and my George Mathias Kunkel. These consecutive tragedies marked the end of the Happ family’s history with Das “Goldene Fass” which had been in business for over 100 years by then. Jakob and Elisabeth’s children emigrated to upstate New York.

As always, I’m indebted to local historian, Georg Veh and the team who wrote the wonderful book “Dorfprozelten Teil II” for information relating to my family, and for the photo of the inn.

There are some tricks to be used when searching these papers:

Tip 1: Spellings may vary from what you’re familiar with, so do try to use the German version eg Georg not George (Not that I’ve found him – yet!)

Tip 2: the first search and the first time an image comes up it is very sloooow. After that, each image comes up much more promptly.

Tip 3: When you get the little image snapshot, you can click the down arrow to see what it includes. Clicking the image itself brings up the whole page.

Tip 4: Once the page has loaded, if you click the download icon at the top right, you can click on the JPG options and see the image separately, enabling you to save it.

Tip 5: This doesn’t tell you which newspaper, date, or page you’ve found it on, so best to include that information in your saved name.

Tip 6: If you have a long place name like Dorfprozelten, it is worth searching with it hyphenated eg Dorf-prozelten as you will get different additional results.

Fass Sale 1868 Aschaffenburger Zeitung

Aschaffenburger Zeitung, 22.12.1846 p4

And now let me share with you my major discovery.

My feeble translation courtesy of my outdated German skills, Reverso and my very large German dictionary…all of which were defeated by some phrases/words/sentences.

In the estate of Jakob Ullrich Widow Elizabeth of Dorfprozelten, auction by the under…(signed?) Notary.

Thursday 17 September …1pm in the Guesthouse “Fass” in Dorfprozelten

  1. Following real estate
  2. The Guesthouse “Fass” Plan number 341 -119 decimal (?) residence with stable, pig house, brewery, barn, bar-hall (??), barn, guest…rooms, well managed (carriageway??) ….and farmyard.
A postcard of Das Goldene Fass mid-20thC. Kindly provided to me by Georg Veh, local historian.

Das Goldene Fass before its demolition for a bank in the 1960s. Image kindly provided by Georg Veh.

Plan number 343* -19 decimal, Entry and farmyard, one-eighth share (??)

Plan number 349-123 decimal, nurseries (hothouses?) to both sides of the carriageway

  1. Plan number 4433-170 decimal, vineyard Rothenhäuser
  2. Plan number 1412-619 decimal, vein/core of the ….(Abschlag) of Hösbach
  3. The same Guesthouse -Inventory

Tables, …., stools/chairs, glasses (?), Beds etc

The inn’s position in the middle of the High Street of some 1200 residents of the village of Dorfprozelten is one of the most favourable.

The Money for the moveable property is therefore…, that for plan numbers 4433 and 1412 to pay nearly 5% ???? in 1869, 1870 and 1871.

The rest largely defeated me but it seems that there was an amount of 2400 florins and 5% interest remaining. (????)

There were three payments due in 1860, 1870 and 1871 at 5%.

Anyone who has better German skills than I do, is more than welcome to correct or clarify. I’ve also discovered from this that perhaps I need to investigate the relevance of Hösbach.

Happy hunting if you’re looking for your Bavarian ancestors’ story.

 

 

“Waves in Time” is rolling in

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Mooloolaba Beach from Surf Lifesavers’ Club.

Things are abuzz on the Sunshine Coast with only “two more sleeps” until “Waves” rolls onto our shores. Waves in Time 2019 is being hosted by History Queensland Inc and Caloundra Family History Research Inc and an enormous effort has gone into hosting this conference – thanks to all those who’ve been involved.

SPONSORS

No conference these days can proceed without the generosity of its sponsors so a huge THANKS to State Library of Queensland (Platinum sponsor); National Archives of Australia and the University of New England (Gold sponsors); Boolarong Press, Ancestry Australia & New Zealand, and Sunshine Coast Council Heritage (Silver sponsors); Gould Genealogy, Unlock the Past and Genebooks and My Heritage (Bronze sponsors); as well as Conference Supporter, Joy Murrin Family History Services.

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Mooloolaba Beach

SPEAKERS

I’m sure you’ve checked out the program but have you also looked at the Speaker Profiles on the Conference website? And find out about the speakers’ interests and what they think are the benefits of a genealogy conference by reading the “Meet the Speaker” interviews hosted on the blogs of the Conference Ambassadors (Shauna Hicks, Fran Kitto, Helen Smith and myself).

EXHIBITORS

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Waves rolling in!

There will be so many wonderful exhibitors at the Fair and the Conference that they can’t all be listed here. Do go to this link and make sure you find your way to each and see what they can offer your family history research. For those dabbling their toes in the genealogical waves, these organisations and societies are a first-step to finding out where you can source information.

Tip: If you’re visiting the Fair only, check out the conference timetable as it’s likely the exhibitor booths will be quieter during presentations.

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Cotton Tree – where the Maroochy River joins the sea.

ATTENDEES – Are you conference ready?

I’m sure you’ve already looked through the program and worked out which presentations you want most to attend. You may have also completed the form that was sent out indicating your preferences.

Tip: It’s okay if you suddenly decide you really, really want to hear the alternate presentation.

Tip: With all the talks on offer, the time between talks will be short and sweet. Never fear, the speakers will be around the conference venue and will welcome enquiries and feedback.

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Coolum Beach at sunset.

Tip: Have you checked out the recent newsletter from the organisers so you’re up to date with what’s happening.

Tip: If you’re on Facebook you can join the Genimates at #wavesintime2019 Facebook Group.

Social Media: the hashtag for Instagram, Twitter, Facebook posts on the conference is #wavesintime2019. Using this tag means others can also follow your posts.

WHAT TO BRING

Your sense of enthusiasm and a happy smile.

Willingness to meet and greet new people.

A print-out of the parking/walking guide from the Conference website.

https://wavesintime2019.org.au/wp-content/uploads/WALK-MAP-AND-PARKING-MAP.pdf

A print-out of the Shuttle Bus timetable.

A notebook or iPad for note taking.

A power pack and phone/iPad charger cords in case your technology gets run down.

Contact/business cards if you have them.

Blogger beads (if you’re a blogger and have them). Have you completed the form on the Genimates Facebook page with your blog name?

A jumper/cardigan/pashmina/jacket in case the air conditioning, or weather, is cool.

If you’re not attending the conference dinner and are planning to go to one of the local venues which offers bus transport, it might be wise to see if you need to book in advance.

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The Glasshouse Mountains from Maleny.

If you want to use public transport, do remember to bring your Go Card with you. This is a link to the bus services on the Coast. https://www.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au/Living-and-Community/Roads-and-Transport/Public-Transport/Bus-and-Train/TransLink-Sunbus

Timetables etc are available on the Translink Journey Planner.

Information on the Go Explore card can be found here.

Can you think of anything I’ve forgotten?

WELCOME

We all hope you have a wonderful time at the Waves in Time 2019 Conference, and that you manage to see some of the beautiful Sunshine Coast while you’re here. After all, we have plenty of real waves as well as genealogical ones! There’s so much fun possible for you or your non-genealogical family.

Here are some choices:

Mooloolaba Beach

Caloundra

Coolum Beach and environs

Australia Zoo

Maleny and the hinterland

Noosa and environs

Sealife, Mooloolaba

Maroochy Bushland Botanic Gardens

Eumundi Markets (go early for parking)

Kiva Genealogists for Families

Have you considered joining your fellow genealogists in supporting the Kiva Genealogists for Families team? You can learn more about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet the Speaker: Dr Jennifer Harrison

Jennifer-HARRISON-225x300Can you believe that it’s only 10 more sleeps until Waves in Time 2019? I hope you’re as excited about it as I am…genimates to catch up with and general family history learning and fun for three full days!!

There’s always something to inspire us at conferences with a range of topics and speakers. Today I want to introduce you to Dr Jennifer Harrison, who will be speaking on In their own words: How 1860s immigrants sailed Waves in Time to Queensland.  Migration is one of my own interests so this is a go-to topic for me personally.

I wonder if you could tell us a little about your background?  Are you a genealogist, researcher, historian or representing your organisation?  

I am an academic historian who believes that among the elements which make up history: a time period, locations, events and people, the most important is people – although in some stories one or more of the other characteristics may also be important.  I think this is reflected in my employment as Queensland researcher for The Australian Dictionary of Biography with ANU Canberra and my long associations with a number of family history societies.  So, I guess, in answering the question, I am a family historian, a researcher, an historian and I fully support the organisations represented by History Queensland.

What do you love most about genealogy/family history/history/heraldry? 

I guess I love the fact that once I start exploring a life story, I never know where it will take me physically, mentally, geographically and in life experiences.

Have you attended a History Queensland Conference in previous years?

Yes, I have attended the two previous functions and will continue into the future because I believe the programs, opportunities to meet people and access to tools, provided by the exhibitors to be incredibly stimulating.

How do you think your topic/s will help the family & local historians at the Waves in Time Conference?

I sincerely hope that my selected topic will assist people realise that there is an end to the long sea journey and that immediate responses by incomers, officials at the destination and facing new prospects required enormous mental and physical energy and demonstrates what strength our forebears displayed in order to make such a big relocation.

Do you have a favourite piece of advice or a tip or trick you can share with conference attendees?

I guess I try to stick by: “Never ever assume” and “Footnote (or appropriately reference) as you go” but I am not always successful – still both are excellent and essential rules.

 What do you think are the benefits of attending a large conference like this, for you personally and for others attending?

The opportunity to seek new solutions, learn new methodologies and make friends in a holiday atmosphere.  Find out new sources, what is available and who is involved – absorb, learn and enjoy.  It is not funding issues that thwart me – time, time, time but I am doing my best.

If you could pick one new project to do, what would it be? (Assuming no funding issues)

Currently it would be to continue with my British soldiers at Moreton Bay project.  Not new?  Then a detailed outline of migration to Queensland during the nineteenth century.

Disclaimer: As a Waves in Time Ambassador I receive a free registration in return for promoting the conference in various social media forums and on my blog.

 

 

Zany, Quirky or Weird?

AtoZ2019ZThis series of blog posts is part of the A to Z 2019 Blogging Challenge in which I will write snapshot memories of my early married life in the then Territory of Papua New Guinea?

 

The ground crew rush to the aircraft

“Take this box to Hagen”

“What’s in it?”

“Mosquitoes from the coast”

Aghast the tourist asks

“What happens if those things get loose in here?”

 

tiger-mosquito-49141_1920

zzzzzz zzzzz I suck your blood! Image from Pixabay.

Zzzzzzzz the annoying whine of a mozzie round your ears

Hope you’ve taken your Camoquin.

Ours is stored in a maxi Pablo jar –

To avoid the risk of poisoning –

Rationed out each Sunday.

——————–

Tinka and Tabitha

The dachsund and the acrobatic cat

Enliven our early mornings

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A PNG butterfly. Image from Wikipedia

Shredded tissues from one

Shredded butterflies the other

A colourful snowstorm in the bedroom.

————————-

Now an adult cat, Tabitha decides to wake me up

And my eyes open to a kitten emerging onto my chest

No respecter of the delivering fur-mum

She is deposited promptly on the floor

My memory is that it was near Anzac Day…why?

—————

A Goroka event draws crowds

Meet up with Aunty Lee and

Let’s go see the gumithon…

Inner tubes and crazy passengers

Hurtle down the chilly river.

Family657

Ferry crossing PNG style – between Kerema and Malalaua (Gulf District). All government vehicles were spray-painted (or bought) in this dark blue colour.

—————-

A late night phone call frightens us

News of a colleague’s murder and

Name confusion in the panic

Anxiety and sadness follow.

————–

We head to the movies

To See Easy Rider

(Of which I remember nothing)

Family669

What did the bishop say to the Prince? I’m lost for words! Independence ceremony at the Catholic Cathedral, Port Moresby 1975.

At the Goroka Cinema

Next to the Zokozoi Hotel.

And our truly weird movie experience

Papillon – for our anniversary

The only time we’ve walked out of a movie, I think.

—————

“Mummy, there’s bugs in my room”

“No there’s not, go to sleep”

Afternoon nap time in Moresby

Eventually I check it out

He is sound asleep with the small fan

Whirring away in flames, sending black specks

Over the space to their bedroom. Whoops, good save.

————-

 

You might think there’d be a zoo in PNG

Instead we took friends to the croc farm

Where we also saw cassowaries and

Magnificent Birds of Paradise

Day to Day we saw little fauna (frogs, snakes, geckos, possums)

And some ordinary birds

It may that many zoological specimens wound up as costumes.

Perhaps more quirky and weird than zany, but life was never dull in PNG.

 

 

Yumi bung wantaim

AtoZ2019YThis series of blog posts is part of the A to Z 2019 Blogging Challenge in which I will write snapshot memories of my early married life in the then Territory of Papua New Guinea.

The start of our life together in Papua New Guinea brought many adventures and experiences, and challenges.

Mitupela: At our reception as we start our new life wantaim.

 

Peters 21st Tower Mill 1970

The newly weds soon after our honeymoon. Dinner at the Tower Mill with his family and mine. Sadly, half of this group have already left us.

 

Tripela Time with the family. Above left: Great-grandmother Cass, Great aunt Olive Cass, maternal Grandma and spoiled baby. Lower left: Happy to be with dad and Aunty Lee. Right: Sending Uncle Philip home for Christmas.

Tripela: My dad with the grandchildren.  Tupela: I always loved this photo.

Kaye and Les Cass with Louisa and Rach 1976

Fopela: Cass grandparents and the grandchildren. The dog was a visitor.

Grandparents Joan and Norman Kunkel with Louisa and Rach 1976

Fopela: In Brisbane with their maternal grandparents at a cousin’s christening.

 

Peter Pauleen and girls c1978

This photo was taken not long before we left Papua New Guinea permanently. Before the year was out we would be faipela.

Tok Pisin:

Yumi bung wantaim – we come together

mitupela – the two of us

wantaim – together

tupela – two people

tripela – three people

fopela – four people

faipela – five people

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X is for PNG Xmases

AtoZ2019XThis series of blog posts is part of the A to Z 2019 Blogging Challenge in which I will write snapshot memories of my early married life in the then Territory of Papua New Guinea. 

Every year the Christmas food

Includes my grandmother’s pudding

And her Scottish shortbread

My mother’s Christmas cake

A traditional hot Christmas dinner

In the tropics! Were we mad?

Louisa Xmas at Kelvin Grove 1972

Christmas in Brisbane. This little one’s first – presents were for eating apparently.

On our first married Xmas

We visited the trade store

Bought a Mouskouri LP

And some baubles for our gum tree

Rain had socked us in

Alotau expats desperate for Xmas treats

Arriving at the last minute – PMF’s meat

Dinner with the Strangs.

——-

On our second married Xmas

On leave in Brisbane

Our baby’s first Christmas

Lots of small gifts and fun

Louisa and Xmas tree Goroka 1973

Her second Christmas – in North Goroka.

With her grandparents

Sadness at a family death.

——–

On our third married Xmas

Now in North Goroka

The little one is enthralled

Her eyes sparkle at the tree

———-

On our fourth married Xmas

Our family has grown larger

A sad little chicken greets her first Xmas

With very sore ears

A drive is needed to calm her down

Before gifts can be found

 

—-

On our fifth married Xmas

We’re in another town now

Our tree another gum

Smiles are seen all round

——

 

Our sixth married Xmas

Two sets of grandparents are now in town

A larger family Christmas

With our friends from all around.

—–

 

Our seventh married Xmas

We’re on our own again

Santa has brought a dolls house

Oh what fun!

—–

Xmas 1977 at Casses

Gerehuligans gather.

Our eighth married Xmas

Will be our last here

New T-shirts proudly state

Ima Gerehuligan

Friends come from Brisbane

Family875Escorted by our little travellers

Fully confident flying solo.

Our turn for Xmas lunch

The Gerehu-ligans bring their share

Sitting round the garden

The sangria is well received

The peach daiquiris are a treat

Fruit sent up from mum and dad.

Three women in matching dresses

In a local printed design

(where did that photo go?).

The kids play games

The adults chat

An excellent day all round.

 

 

 

 

Wewak Wandering

AtoZ2019WThis series of blog posts is part of the A to Z 2019 Blogging Challenge in which I will write snapshot memories of my early married life in the then Territory of Papua New Guinea.

His father had two postings in Wewak

On the first, the headmaster

Brandi High School

Family662

Himself with his dad – they didn’t look alike at all. Tinka the dachshund takes pride of place.

For him, a new sibling and

Religious education for boarding school.

 

On the second posting

His dad was District Superintendent

East Sepik District.

We were able to visit their house on the hill

And spend time with the family.

 

Tok Pisin:

wantok – friend or relation

wanem – what

wanpela – one person/thing

wantaim – together

waswas – shower/wash/bath

 

 

 

V is for Variata Outings

AtoZ2019VThis series of blog posts is part of the A to Z 2019 Blogging Challenge in which I will write snapshot memories of my early married life in the then Territory of Papua New Guinea. 

Our most popular weekend outing

To Varirata National Park

Or as we called it, Variarata,

Did it change or were we wrong all along?

Cass family and friends at Variarata copy

Family and friends sit on the fence, Variarata. © P Cass 1975.

It was another go-to place

For our visitors to Moresby

Out past Ilimo Farm,

Then Rouna Falls

To see if it was in flood.

All the kids loved to run and play

In the open spaces or across creeks

Or climb up the rickety stairs

To the bush materials tree house.

One Boxing Day, all the Gerehu-igans,

Adults and children, travelled in convoy

A barbeque in the bush

Variarata picnic view

To share with our Christmas visitors.

De rigeur was a photo of the crowd

Sitting on the fence

Overlooking the distant harbour.

Simple, happy times and memories.

view from Variarata

The view from Variarata.

vanimo png

This beautiful image is one taken by himself on an audit trip to Vanimo.

 

 

 

War in PNG – Anzac Day 2019

AtoZ2019WThis series of blog posts is part of the A to Z 2019 Blogging Challenge in which I will write snapshot memories of my early married life in the then Territory of Papua New Guinea. 

No, I haven’t forgotten my alphabetical order, but today is Anzac Day in Australia so I’ve jumped over V to post W today.

Lest we forget

The meaning of war in the tropics

Comes home when you live there.

DSC_0586

The Battle of Milne Bay Memorial at Alotau.

The pounding rain, the heavy clouds

The dense jungle obscuring villages.

No wonder some men were overtaken by fear

As the leaves closed in on them

(do read this link and the comments especially)

This poem by David Campbell captures it also –

An extract from Men in Green:

Their eyes were bright, their looks were dull

Their skin had turned to clay

Nature had met them in the night

dsc_0783-crop

Stained glass memorial in the Catholic church at Alotau. Photo P Cass 2012

And stalked them in the day.

And I think still of men in green

On the Soputa track

With fifteen spitting tommy-guns

To keep a jungle back.

Soon after my arrival in Milne Bay

Planes were searching through the clouds

For a crashed aircraft missing on a mountain of dense jungle

This sound on Anzac Day evoked a sense of war and danger

Bringing it home to me in a real way, not theoretical.

The Battle of Milne Bay should rank with Kokoka or Gallipoli

The first land defeat of the Japanese during the war

Needs to gain more prominence

A Victoria Cross won not far from our home

By Corporal John French from Crows Nest, Queensland.

World War I discovery in Milne Bay, Papua

Sadds Ridge Rd sign

The allied airfield at Gurney was adjacent to Gili Gili Plantation

Where my husband worked before our marriage

An old street sign found there is a proud heirloom

A reminder of some ANZAC

For whom it was a little bit of home.

 

 

 

French and so many other men who gave their lives

Are buried in Bomana Cemetery in Port Moresby

A site where we took our visitors.

Kokoka Track memorial

Owers’ Corner

Another historic location for us to visit was Owers’ Corner

Near Sogeri, on the Moresby side of the Kokoda Track.

Last week I talked about my husband’s early days in Popondetta

Less than a decade from the war

It had been near the northern end of Kokoda

So many men would have succumbed without their own courage

Or that of the Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels who supported them.

My uncle was an Army cook in PNG and I inherited his photographs. They do say an Army marches on its stomach.

 

 

Lest we forget

I have written two posts about Anzac Day as part of previous A to Z challenges:

V is for the Valiant of Villers-Brettoneux

V is for our Valiant Indigenous Anzacs.

 

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Uniformity in housing

AtoZ2019U

This series of blog posts is part of the A to Z 2019 Blogging Challenge in which I will write snapshot memories of my early married life in the then Territory of Papua New Guinea. 

Public Servants and expats in PNG

Were provided with housing

Fibro external walls mostly

Louvres in all the windows for the breeze

Basic furniture and appliances

Maintenance by the Public Works Department.

21 Alotau house Cass

Our first home was the AR16 allocated to Mr Cassmob’s parents, who were in Moresby for a few months. Photo probably 1968 before his mother worked her magic in the garden.

Standard designs meant we always knew

Where all the rooms were –

No confusion over bathroom trips.

No matter that we would have the same layout

The residents’ personality was displayed

In their own possessions and styling

Visiting new friends could be quite fascinating

Looking at books and souvenirs.

Alotau 1960s view house 1

The view of Milne Bay from the relaxation area house #1, taken circa 1968.

The size house you were allocated,

And the location,

Often depended on status as well as

Family size and general availability.

We had three houses in Alotau

Two were three-bedroom AR16s

High set with concrete underneath for entertaining

Or just a cool breeze and an evening drink.

Our house at Nth Goroka 1971

Our north Goroka AR20 with the laundry downstairs, a vegie patch in the back corner, and a village over the fence.

Our final house was an AR10, two bedrooms, low-set

Quite the pain in the Wet Season with an infant’s nappies.

All had slow combustion stoves for heating and cooking

Chopping wood was part of the day’s ritual.

In North Goroka our home was a highset AR20

The laundry in the open downstairs, dirt “floor”

Baby’s playpen was a packing case near me.

Twin tub washing machines meant lengthy laundry sessions

No wonder, I suppose, that many expats had local house staff

Louisa and Rach with Les Goroka 1973

My father-in-law with the kids outside our West Goroka house. Big bear had been very sick.

I feared that if I started married life like that I’d never readjust.

We moved to West Goroka just the week before #2 child was born

A Dillingham, three bedrooms, low set

Across from the hospital and on the PMV route

Self-government came while we lived there.

Brandi in lounge room in Moresby c1978

Our Gerehu house – lounge room. Don’t have a hangover with those 70s curtains!

Our move to Gerehu in Port Moresby

Came with an M-type house, three bedrooms, low set

Trapdoors in the bedroom required a bookcase on top

A favourite point of entry for raskols

We acquire an automatic machine and a water bed

Not the government issued metal frame

We must be grown-ups now.

Neighbours became good friends.

Some now deceased, others are like family.

Alotau, Milne Bay wharf

The view from house #3 in Alotau spoiled us forever – what else could come close?